If you cannot reach an agreement, you may consider applying to a court for orders. Sometimes this may be the only way to deal with a dispute.

There are steps you must take before applying to a court. 

What does it mean to file an application?

You file an application at a court when you cannot reach your own agreement. If you file, it begins a court process that may result in a hearing before a judge. You will need to follow the procedures of the court you have filed in.

For more information about the division of work between the Family Court and the Federal Circuit Court, see the Protocol for the Division of Work.
For more information about the division of work between the Family Court and the Federal Circuit Court, see the Protocol for the Division of Work.

What orders can I apply for?

To find out what orders you can apply for in family law go to the Court Orders section of this website.
To find out what orders you can apply for in family law go to the Court Orders section of this website.

Do I have to pay a filing fee?

Yes. You will be required to pay a filing fee. You may qualify for fee reduction if you meet certain criteria. For more information see the Fees section.
Yes. You will be required to pay a filing fee. You may qualify for fee reduction if you meet certain criteria. For more information see the Fees section.

What is service?

Service is the legal term to describe the giving of court documents by one person to another. It means giving the other person a copy of your documents in a way that satisfies a court that the other person has received them.

For more information see:

How do I respond to an application?

The respondent must receive from the applicant copies of the application stamped by the Court through a process known as service. The respondent then has the opportunity to respond if they do not agree with the orders sought in the application.

What is a subpoena?

A subpoena is issued by a court generally at the request of a party, requiring a person to produce documents or give evidence to the Court.