This fact sheet is for people who need information on the procedures and requirements for Compulsory Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) prior to the commencement of family law proceedings.

FDR is a practical way for separating families to try to resolve any disagreements and make arrangements for the future without going to court.

Procedures

Except in limited circumstances, the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) (the Act) requires you to obtain a certificate from a registered FDR practitioner before you file an application for an order in relation to a child under Part VII of the Act. Part VII of the Act covers applications for several different types of orders relating to children. The most common are applications for parenting orders; that is, an application asking a court to make orders about the parenting arrangements for a child.

When do I need to provide a certificate?

If your application is for a parenting order, then you must file a certificate with your application to the Court. This requirement applies even if you have pre-existing orders in relation to the child that is the subject of the current application. However, in certain circumstances the Court may grant you an exemption from the requirement to file a certificate. Refer to ‘What are the exceptions to providing a certificate?’ below.

When don’t I need to provide a certificate?

You do not have to provide a certificate if you are seeking:

  • interim or procedural orders only (generally these are orders to operate until your case has a final hearing) unless you are applying for these orders at the same time as filing an Initiating Application (Family Law).
  • interim or procedural orders only (generally these are orders to operate until your case has a final hearing) unless you are applying for these orders at the same time as filing an Initiating Application (Family Law).
  • financial orders only
  • consent orders
  • Hague Abduction Convention orders
  • property settlement only, even if you have a child/ren
  • child support, or
  • an amended application (relating to a child that is the subject of the current application).

What are the exceptions to providing a certificate?

Under section 60I(9) of the Act, you can seek an exemption from providing a certificate in the following circumstances:

  • if your matter is urgent
  • if the Court is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds to believe that:
    • there has been child abuse and/or family violence by a party
    • there is a risk of family violence by a party, and/or
    • there is a risk of child abuse if there were to be a delay in applying to the Court
  • where a party is unable to participate effectively in FDR (for example, due to an incapacity to do so or physical remoteness from a FDR provider)
  • if your application relates to an alleged contravention of an existing order that was made within the last 12 months, and there are reasonable grounds to believe that the person who has allegedly contravened the order has behaved in a way that shows a serious disregard for his or her obligations under that order.

To apply for an exemption for any of the reasons above –

In the Family Court, you must either:

The Affidavit - Non-Filing of Family Dispute Resolution Certificate is available on the Family Court's website at www.familycourt.gov.au.

In the Federal Circuit Court, you must either:

Family violence or child abuse exemption

If you seek to apply for an exemption relating to family violence or child abuse, you may need to obtain information from a family counsellor or FDR practitioner about the services and options (including alternatives to court action) available to you in circumstances of abuse or violence. You can get this information by calling the Family Relationship Advice Line on 1800 050 321 or by talking to a family counsellor or FDR practitioner.

This does not mean that you must attend family dispute resolution or make endeavours to do so. All that you are required to do is obtain information about services and options that are available.

You must provide written acknowledgment of receiving the information. You can do this by completing the form Acknowledgment - Information from a Family Counsellor or Family Dispute Resolution Practitioner. This form is available on the Family Court's website at www.familycourt.gov.au. In the Federal Circuit Court, you may instead include this information in the affidavit filed in support of your application.

Obtaining the information is not required where, in addition to the grounds listed above, the Court is satisfied there are reasonable grounds to believe that:

  • there would be a risk of abuse of a child if there were a delay in applying for the order, or
  • there is a risk of family violence by one of the parties to the proceedings.

What happens if I don’t file a certificate or an affidavit applying for an exemption?

A certificate is required when you file your application unless the matter falls within one of the exceptions outlined above, in which case you must file an affidavit. If these requirements are not met, the Court cannot accept your application.

Legal advice

You should seek legal advice before deciding what to do. A lawyer can help you understand your legal rights and responsibilities, and explain how the law applies to your case. A lawyer can also help you reach an agreement with the other party without going to court. You can seek legal advice from a legal aid office, community legal centre or private law firm. Court staff can help you with questions about court forms and the court process, but cannot give you legal advice.

Personal safety

If you have any concerns about your safety while attending court, please call 1300 352 000 before your court appointment or hearing. Options for your safety at court will be discussed and arrangements put in place. By law, people must inform a court if there is an existing or pending family violence order involving themselves or their children. More detail is available in the brochure ‘Do you have fears for your safety when attending court?’ available on the Courts’ websites:

Need more information?

For more information about compulsory FDR (or to find a FDR service provider in your local area) call the Family Relationships Advice Line on 1800 050 321 or go to www.familyrelationships.gov.au.

For more information about filing an application with the courts:

Family law registries

Australian Capital Territory

Canberra ~ Cnr University Ave and Childers St, Canberra ACT 2600

New South Wales

Albury ~ Level 1, 463 Kiewa St, Albury NSW 2640
Dubbo ~ Cnr Macquarie and Wingewarra Sts, Dubbo NSW 2830
Lismore ~ Level 2, 29-31 Molesworth St, Lismore NSW 2480
Newcastle ~ 61 Bolton St, Newcastle NSW 2300
Parramatta ~ 1-3 George St, Parramatta NSW 2150
Sydney ~ 97-99 Goulburn St, Sydney NSW 2000
Wollongong ~ Level 1, 43 Burelli St, Wollongong NSW 2500

Northern Territory

Darwin ~ Supreme Court Building, State Square, Darwin NT 0800

South Australia

Adelaide ~ 3 Angas St, Adelaide SA 5000

Tasmania

Hobart ~ 39-41 Davey St, Hobart Tas 7000
Launceston ~ Level 3, ANZ Building Cnr Brisbane and George Sts Launceston Tas 7250

Queensland

Brisbane ~ 119 North Quay Brisbane Qld 4000
Cairns ~ Level 3 and 4, 104 Grafton St, Cairns Qld 4870
Rockhampton ~ 46 East St (Cnr Fitzroy St) Rockhampton Qld 4700
Townsville ~ Level 2, Commonwealth Centre, 143 Walker St, Townsville Qld 4810

Victoria

Dandenong ~ 53-55 Robinson St Dandenong Vic 3175
Melbourne ~ 305 William St Melbourne Vic 3000

Family Court Of Western Australia

Family Court of Western Australia ~150 Terrace Rd Perth WA 6000
Telephone: 08 9224 8222
Website: www.familycourt.wa.gov.au

FSCompFamOrd_1220V1